click to show more information

click to hide/show information About your Search

20130117
20130125
Search Results 0 to 12 of about 13 (some duplicates have been removed)
at 12:01 or thereabouts, everyone in the process will be looking to their next election except for the president. so his clock moves faster than anyone els as he looks broader and farther, everyone else with a stake in the system will be looking narrower and more closely at their next election. so it'll be very tough. there's also the mathematical reality reality. four more years and the hardest job in the world means you have four more years of incredibly different problems. i promise you when we watch his successor drive up pennsylvania avenue in four years, we'll be talking about something we will not mention today. some unforeseen crisis. >> andrea mitchell what are you looking for over the next four years? >> you have a president who is actually energized by a feeling of possibilities. i think the way he took on guns that whole issue, that was not discussed at all during the campaign. he responded to the crisis. one of his opponents, ted cruz, the new tea-party supported senator said on "meet the press" yesterday, well he exploited it within minutes. t
, you know, president obama is now won election twice with over 5%, 50% of the vote, which is, you know, he is, he and joe biden, those only two offices everybody votes for. and he has won. he got over 50%. so he will make his case. i think what is different, what is significantly different, there will be confrontation but i think the first time you're seeing the president move hess campaign organization, we just saw this in the last few days, move it into advocacy on the issues for his agenda during the second term. that's unprecedented. no president's ever been able it do that. and this time it is not with some rinky-dink campaign organization that we've seen in the past. this is the biggest campaign organization ever seen in the united states. 28, 30 million people. those people making the case to their members of congress regardless of party, whether the member is democrat or republican. i think could change the way we look at a lame duck second term presidency because of the power of that grassroots organization. bill: wow! that's a big statement, joe. back to the initial question
it because he doesn't have to worry about getting re-elected. >> well, he wasn't concealing anything. he's a progressive democrat. i loved the speech yesterday because of what he didn't say. he very often goes into this kind of airy dreaming of how we'll just transcend partisanship. well, we won't. politics is partisan. washington is partisan. it was for president clinton who wanted to campaign that he was there, campaigned saying i want to be a uniter, not a divider. our president said, he offered a vision that republicans should sign on to. they used to be tough when i was a kid. now they are just whiny. he reached out to them plenty in his first term and all they did was spit in his eye. >> i think when it comes to comprehensive immigration reform, i think the president can work with senator marco rubio. but what about on climate change? what about same-sex marriage? is there going to be cooperation in those two areas? >> number one, on same-sex marriage, the president hasn't thrown any weight behind legislation or for repealing the legislation that paul's because, bill's boss signed
the president for a moa. he's only the 16th president ever elected to two consecutive terms. we've heard a lot about second term curses that have brought down richard nixon, hampered ronald reagan, bill clinton. people forget reagan was able to get tax reform, bill clinton was able to get a balanced budget. certainly a big opportunity for the president but fully aware in the white house, a lot of challenges ahead as well, jenna. >> certainly not challenges for a father. nice to see the first family, ed, and how much the girls have grown up over the last four years. what we're looking at for the president tomorrow besides the hair styles and what everybody is wearing at the inauguration is what is he going to say? what will be the address to the nation tomorrow? you mentioned some policy challenges ahead. what are you hearing about tomorrow's address and how that might set the table, if you will, for the years to come? >> true. what i'm hearing is the state of the union address next month is really where the president will go with a deeper dive on policy, whether it be gun control, immigration
% of the members. they're sick and tired of getting elected to go up to washington, do their job, sit on committees, work through bills that come through their committees, and then take those bills to the house floor, the senate floor, vote on them, then go to conference. i joked before, it was a lot like, you know, i'm just a bill. "schoolhouse rock." that doesn't happen anymore. americans don't realize that you always end up with a couple of people behind closed doors in the back -- we were on the hill yesterday. i heard this complaint from republicans, from democrats, from senators, from congressmen and congresswomen. they all say the same thing. we don't get to do our jobs. they come up here and in the end it's always the president and john boehner in a back room, and we just sit around. >> so much of the disillusionment you hear from members who feel they're going to make a difference is exactly what you're talking about. and so much of the infighting is really not so much between the parties, while there's plenty of that, there is such a frustration between house and senate. they openly knock
, and balanced peace plan that was proposed by me as the prime minister of israel. >> during the u.s. election, i was in israel last summer. mitt romney, governor mitt romney, the republican candidate, came by. it seemed to me that bebe netanyahu was essentially endorsing mr. romney's candidacy. they did a big fundraiser in israel. you were very critical of that. do you think that prime minister netanyahu was unfairly or inappropriately intervening in the u.s. election? is that why you were so critical? >> i think it was a terrible mistake. i don'i don't think that it is r duty or it is our interest to intervene in the political process in the united states. the appearance of support by netanyahu to romney, i must say i know romney very well. he's really a genuine good friend of israel and i respect him very much, but it was not for us to interfere in this process. >> you called governor romney, mr. prime minister, a good friend of israel. is barack obama a good friend of israel? >> no doubt in my mind. i was very close to president bush when he was president. we are still friends. what happens h
is the first african-american elected. he used language interesting to me. that we owe a lot to our founding documents. he referred a lot to the founding documents, not a lot to the founding documents. the founding fathers owned slaves. >> a process ever since. let's play a little bit about what he said. i think the constant looking back to the constitution was a very strong theme in his speech yesterday. let's play that. >> we hold these truths to be self-evident. that all men are creating equal. that they are endowed by their creator with certainly unalienable rights, and among these are life, liberty, and the pursuit of happiness. >> and with that, he sort of launched into not an olive branch, he launched into here is the preparation for the fight ahead for the next four years. is that how you saw it? >> i saw it almost a campaign speech for 2014. we need congress, need to get this thing done, yeah. i saw it that way. and very interesting. the republicans and democrats are both in this death embrace. they each have their own constituents, throwing a lot of money at them on both sides. rep
interesting thing to compare him to would be right after the 2010 elections when they brought in daly which signaled that they wanted to change their approach inside the white house, wanted to reach out to business, wanted to try to reach out to republicans, have better relationships with the house and senate. what this pick signals is that it's going to be a more combative white house, continue to be a pretty insular white house. i think some of the bellyaching speci internally, it's another white guy in leadership role inside the white house. it signals to me an approach where they're ready for combat. we see that in the legislation they're talking about for the next year that he wants to be pushing. and that also just the reality that the next two years are not going to be a pleasant two years for relationships between the white house and congress. nobody's expecting a grand bargain anymore. i think the chance -- they had a good chance to have one a couple months ago. they have almost no chance to get one now. the reality is it's going to be grind it out for the next couple years. he has
of the obama re-election campaign puts out a letter, among other things, saying take a look at the president's plan to reduce gun violence and stand with him in support. wayne lapierre, executive vice president of the nra issues a fundraising letter saying this. i warned you this day was coming and now it's here. it's not about protecting your children. it's not about stopping crime. it's about banning your guns, period. so what are we seeing here? a real political campaign. >> on the one side you have the grassroots organization that the obama for america team use. now, they can't coordinate with the white house, wolf, on this, but they are using all of their apparatus to get out their grass root supporters because what they are trying to do is mobilize voters in much the same way that the nra has done over the years, which w want something done. on the other side is the nra, which has a huge grassroots organization. they are trying to mobilize their own voters. you saw that e-mail. we spoke yesterday about this provocative ad talking about the president's children are protected by people w
Search Results 0 to 12 of about 13 (some duplicates have been removed)